The Parish of St. Augustine

As a man of 32 years, Augustine of Hippo was the despair of his mother Monica. His life to that point had been full of trouble, of searching and half-hearted praying that God save him---but not too soon, O Lord. As he wept, tormented by his lack of faith, in the garden of a house in Milan far away from his hometown near Carthage, he heard a child's singsong voice, repeating "Tolle, lege, tolle, lege..." ("Take and read, take and read..."). He again picked up the epistles of St. Paul and saw this: "... put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the desires of the flesh." (Romans, chapter 13:13-14)

He felt as if the words were directed to him: "It was as though my heart was filled with a light of confidence and all the shadows of my doubt were swept away." Now ready to open his heart to God's will, he was baptized by St. Ambrose at Easter the following year, 387, along with his son Adeodatus and his friend Alypius. (St. Augustine's Confessions, VIII, 12)

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Twenty-fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time + + + September 18, 2016

Gospel                              Luke 16: 1-13

Jesus said to his disciples,
“A rich man had a steward
who was reported to him for squandering his property. 
He summoned him and said,
‘What is this I hear about you? 
Prepare a full account of your stewardship,
because you can no longer be my steward.’
The steward said to himself, ‘What shall I do,
now that my master is taking the position of steward away from me? 
I am not strong enough to dig and I am ashamed to beg. 
I know what I shall do so that,
when I am removed from the stewardship,
they may welcome me into their homes.’
He called in his master’s debtors one by one. 
To the first he said,
‘How much do you owe my master?’
He replied, ‘One hundred measures of olive oil.’
He said to him, ‘Here is your promissory note. 
Sit down and quickly write one for fifty.’
Then to another the steward said, ‘And you, how much do you owe?’
He replied, ‘One hundred kors of wheat.’
The steward said to him, ‘Here is your promissory note;
write one for eighty.’
And the master commended that dishonest steward for acting prudently.
“For the children of this world
are more prudent in dealing with their own generation
than are the children of light. 
I tell you, make friends for yourselves with dishonest wealth,
so that when it fails, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings.
The person who is trustworthy in very small matters
is also trustworthy in great ones;
and the person who is dishonest in very small matters
is also dishonest in great ones. 
If, therefore, you are not trustworthy with dishonest wealth,
who will trust you with true wealth? 
If you are not trustworthy with what belongs to another,
who will give you what is yours? 
No servant can serve two masters. 
He will either hate one and love the other,
or be devoted to one and despise the other. 
You cannot serve both God and mammon.”